IN THE NEWS

Artist brings attention to detail to second solo show

The Bakersfield Californian

December 6, 2016

PHOTO CAPTION: James Dean takes a Coke break with two new friends in "Little Giants", one of the intricate in David J. Vanderpool's solo exhibit at the Arts Council of Kern.

Thursday, artist David Vanderpool debuts his second solo exhibit in as many years at the Arts Council of Kern. You may have seen his art displayed at the Kern County Fair, where his drawings have won many awards over the years, but it was his work at Kern Valley and Corcoran state prisons that caught the eye of the Arts Council. Of course, that work was as an instructor for Arts-in-Corrections, which provides rehabilitative arts services in state correctional facilities.

LittleGiantsJamesDean_Vanderpool.jpg

"The talent there is amazing," he said of the group of inmates he teaches. "Some, they know how to draw but want to go to the next step. Some are so good they just sit in the back and work on their projects."

 

One of Vanderpool's pieces in the current show, "Dickey Moore and Petey" (the "Our Gang" character and his dog), served as a teaching tool for his class. Another of a 1926 Ford Model T was used in class and was the last work finished for the exhibit.

 

After the enthusiastic reception to his first solo show last summer, David Gordon, the council's executive director, asked if Vanderpool would be interested in another exhibition.

 

Gordon described Vanderpool's work as extremely sensitive, running the gamut of values from the darkest darks to lightest lights.

 

"People really respond to his art, first by his talent then the subject matter," Gordon wrote in an email. "They find it so hard to believe that someone can do this type of work. He brings a respect from visitors that few do.

"His work is so thorough with detail and execution that I am not sure if it intimidates or encourages people to create and explore pencil drawing themselves."

 

Of the 21 drawings on display, more than half are new, created in the last year. While his job as a marketing assistant for Delano Regional Medical Center during the week and his teaching at Corcoran on Saturdays take up most of his time, Vanderpool sets aside evening hours and Sundays to draw. 

 

Using free domain images or those from his photographer colleagues, he creates a reference photo for each work. 

 

Creating a unique image is key for his work, the artist said.

 

"You don’t want to just take any photo and copy it. That’s great for practice but as an artist you want something original."

 

For some works, especially those set in medieval or other time periods, he researches appropriate backgrounds, then depicts modern models in period settings.  

 

One example is his new work "Cory." Starting with a photo of a model friend, whom the artist describes as "just a shirtless gentleman," Vanderpool created a Viking-era piece. The bat he was holding like a club became a pike and the plain black background gave way to a river and mountain scene. 

 

Vanderpool joked that viewers may initially miss the finer details or see them "after the guy's arms and muscles."

Most of the works, both the originals and prints, will be available for sale. There will also be two giveaways, one for those attending the opening reception and another for the run of the exhibit, which goes through Jan. 27. Reception attendees can enter their name to win a print of "Dickey Moore and Petey" while later attendees have a chance to win a "Little Giants" print, featuring actor James Dean.

 

Thursday, artist David Vanderpool debuts his second solo exhibit in as many years at the Arts Council of Kern. You may have seen his art displayed at the Kern County Fair, where his drawings have won many awards over the years, but it was his work at Kern Valley and Corcoran state prisons that caught the eye of the Arts Council. Of course, that work was as an instructor for Arts-in-Corrections, which provides rehabilitative arts services in state correctional facilities.

 

"The talent there is amazing," he said of the group of inmates he teaches. "Some, they know how to draw but want to go to the next step. Some are so good they just sit in the back and work on their projects."

 

One of Vanderpool's pieces in the current show, "Dickey Moore and Petey" (the "Our Gang" character and his dog), served as a teaching tool for his class. Another of a 1926 Ford Model T was used in class and was the last work finished for the exhibit.

 

After the enthusiastic reception to his first solo show last summer, David Gordon, the council's executive director, asked if Vanderpool would be interested in another exhibition.

 

Gordon described Vanderpool's work as extremely sensitive, running the gamut of values from the darkest darks to lightest lights.

 

"People really respond to his art, first by his talent then the subject matter," Gordon wrote in an email. "They find it so hard to believe that someone can do this type of work. He brings a respect from visitors that few do.

"His work is so thorough with detail and execution that I am not sure if it intimidates or encourages people to create and explore pencil drawing themselves."

 

Of the 21 drawings on display, more than half are new, created in the last year. While his job as a marketing assistant for Delano Regional Medical Center during the week and his teaching at Corcoran on Saturdays take up most of his time, Vanderpool sets aside evening hours and Sundays to draw. 

 

Using free domain images or those from his photographer colleagues, he creates a reference photo for each work. 

 

Creating a unique image is key for his work, the artist said.

 

"You don’t want to just take any photo and copy it. That’s great for practice but as an artist you want something original."

 

For some works, especially those set in medieval or other time periods, he researches appropriate backgrounds, then depicts modern models in period settings.  

 

One example is his new work "Cory." Starting with a photo of a model friend, whom the artist describes as "just a shirtless gentleman," Vanderpool created a Viking-era piece. The bat he was holding like a club became a pike and the plain black background gave way to a river and mountain scene. 

 

Vanderpool joked that viewers may initially miss the finer details or see them "after the guy's arms and muscles."

Most of the works, both the originals and prints, will be available for sale. There will also be two giveaways, one for those attending the opening reception and another for the run of the exhibit, which goes through Jan. 27. Reception attendees can enter their name to win a print of "Dickey Moore and Petey" while later attendees have a chance to win a "Little Giants" print, featuring actor James Dean.

 

 

Oliver Trial Postponed

Two Days

The Bakersfield Californian

December 1, 2014

A composite sketch of the courtroom during the trial of Bryan Oliver. This piece shows Judge John W. Lua at far left with the court reporter and clerk seated near him. In the foreground on the left is Chief Deputy District Attorney Mark Pafford, and on the right is Oliver; his attorney, Deputy Public Defender Paul Cadman; and Public Defender’s office investigator Tiara Lowe. This sketch is drawn from file photos and the artist’s courtroom observations.

 Oliver Trial - 120114b.jpg

Oliver Trial So Far: Battery allegations, disturbing videos and the return of sketch artistry

Friday, Nov 21 2014 05:17 PM

BY JASON KOTOWSKI

The Bakersfield Californian jkotowski@bakersfield.com

 

SKETCH ARTISTS 

    Photographers have been banned from the courtroom for the duration of the trial, but sketch artists are allowed. Both The Californian and a local television station have published drawings from inside the courtroom.

    David Vanderpool, a graphic artist employed at The Californian for 16 years, said the trial marks the first time he's done courtroom sketches. He described the experience as "cool" but noted difficulties due to less than perfect lighting conditions and the distance he's forced to sit from the subjects he's drawing.

    "When you draw anybody, it's important to get the eyes or it's not that person," he said.

    Vanderpool, 53, said he takes an average of two weeks to complete highly detailed portraits. Courtroom sketches require him to turn around a number of drawings in a single day.

    He likes some of the sketches more than others. He jokingly expressed surprise that his sketches of Judge John W. Lua haven't resulted in warrants for his arrest.

    Vanderpool said he has to ignore testimony while he drawing as "it's emotionally draining."

    "I've lost sleep doing this," he said.

Courtroom Sketches during The Bryan Oliver Trial

Completed while employeed with The Bakersfield Californian

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Oliver Trial - 120114_lowres
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Bryan Oliver trial _in progress
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Bryan Oliver_trial 110714
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Bryan Oliver by David J. Vanderpool
Bryan Oliver by David J. Vanderpool
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Oliver_trial 110714_victim
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Oliver Trial Nov18_a
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Oliver_trial 110714_A
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Oliver Trial Nov18_a
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Oliver Trial 120314_4b
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Oliver_trial 110714_B
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Oliver Trial 120314_1
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Judge during Bryan Oliver Trial
Judge during Bryan Oliver Trial
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Oliver Trial 120314_3
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Dr. Kris Mohandie_lowres
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Oliver Trial 120314_2
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Bryan Oliver Family
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Screen Shot 2014-11-21
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Screen Shot 2014-11-19 at 9.15.52 PM
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Screen Shot KGET
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Inside The Bakersfield Californian & Bakersfield Life

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Eye Street | Pencil in a visit to th
Eye Street | Pencil in a visit to th

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The Fine Art of Pencil Drawing
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Eye Street Section

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